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Revocable Living Trusts

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Everything you should know regarding revocable living trusts. A revocable living trust is a favorable estate planning device that you can utilize to determine who is going to get your property when you pass away. Many living trusts are “revocable” due to the fact that you can modify them as your situation or wants change. Theses trusts are “living” since you make them throughout your life. Lawyers often refer this as “inter vivos.” Key Takeaways:

  • A revocable living trust is a favorable estate planning device that you can manage throughout your life and utilize to leave property when you pass away.
  • Utilizing this type of trust can avoid probate, in which can be a convoluted and time-consuming process, and estate taxes.
  • Revocable living trusts are easily set up and can be created without the assistance of a lawyer.

Revocable Living Trusts Bypass Probate

A lot of individuals use living trusts to bypass probate. Probate is the court-monitored process of settling an individual’s estate. Probate can be costly, laborious, and is usually more of an impediment than an aid. Property left using a living trust can transfer to beneficiaries devoid of probate.

Pros and Cons of a Living Trust

Whereas saving your friends and family from the burden and cost of the probate process is the utmost benefit of a living trust, there are a couple of others:

  • privacy (a will is accessible by the public, whereas a trust document is usually private)
  • greater authority over finances
  • the capability to plan for incapacitation, and
  • better safeguarding from court disputes.

The main disadvantages of living trusts are:

  • the added time and cost of devising and maintaining a living trust, and
  • less safeguarding from creditors.

A lot of individuals use lawyers to devise a living trust, and their costs can be high. (However, you can also create a simple living trust on your own, using Will Maker & Trust.) Additionally, you are going to need to take the time to be sure that your property is maintained by the trust. If you obtain property later on, you are going to need to make sure it gets transferred to your trust, or that you acquire title to the property as trustee of the trust, instead of individually.

The Trust Document

A living trust document is written documentation, signed by the trust creator and a notary public. The document is required to list the property in the trust, designate a trustee, and appoint who is going to get the property when the trust creator passes away. The trustee is the individual that is going to maintain the property. While the trust creator is living, the trustee is typically the trust creator and then a replacement trustee takes over following the trust creator’s passing.

Transferring Property into the Trust

Following the trust document being created, its creator is required to transfer any property they want covered by the trust into it. For many things, this requires simply including a list of property inside the trust document. Nevertheless, titled property (such as real estate) is required to be re-titled in the name of the trust. This is typically not complicated or challenging, but it is required to be done correctly or the titled property might end up in probate.

Revocable Living Trusts vs. Wills

Below is a comparison of what living trusts and achieve, in contrast to wills. Many estate planning objectives can be done by each a living trusts and wills, whereas others are going to necessitate you to apply either a trust or a will. Using both wills and revocable living trusts you are able to:

  • designate beneficiaries for property
  • leave property to younger children, and
  • amend your documentation as your situation or wishes change.

With a trust, instead of a will, you can:

  • bypass probate
  • decrease the chance of a court challenge over your estate
  • bypass a conservatorship, and
  • keep your documentation private following death.

With a will, not a trust, you are able to:

  • designate guardians for children
  • appoint an executor, and
  • detail how liabilities or taxes need to be paid.

Revocable Living Trusts vs. Irrevocable Trusts

Many various kinds of trusts, with various purposes, subsist. To discover more about irrevocable trusts, which are able to be used for objectives like bypassing estate taxes or providing for an individual with special needs, go to Irrevocable Living Trusts.

Do You Require A Lawyer to Create a Trust?

You don’t have to have a law degree to create a living trust. If you have a somewhat straightforward circumstance and you are willing to put in the work, you can create your own revocable living trust. On the other hand, some situations warrant seeking a lawyer for assistance.

Source:

  1. Betsy Simmons Hannibal, A. (2020, October 22). Revocable living trusts. www.nolo.com. Retrieved December 19, 2022, from https://www.nolo.com/legal-encyclopedia/revocable-living-trusts.html

 
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