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A. On motion of any party asserting that a child or parent has a statutory or contractual right to receive services from an agency or private service provider, either directly or as a third party beneficiary, a court, after giving notice and an opportunity to be heard, may order the agency or private service provider to appear at a hearing to discuss the child or parent’s service plan.

B. If the child or parent is eligible to receive behavioral health services with title XIX or XXI of the social security act monies, the court may order the agency or private service provider to provide only those behavioral health services that the agency or private service provider determines to be medically necessary covered services.

C. This section does not prohibit the agency or private service provider that has received notice of the hearing from meeting with the parent or child’s representative before the hearing to coordinate services.

D. For the purposes of this section, “private service provider” means any individual or entity that receives federal, state or local government funding or reimbursement for providing services directly to a child who is adjudicated a ward of the court.

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